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HR U Can Trust Blog

A blog providing trustworthy Human Resources advice to business owners, managers and employees plus the occasional LOL true story from the workplace.

Should I Tell Anyone What Happened?

Carolyn Boyes - Tuesday, February 26, 2019

Should I Tell Anyone What Happened?

By now, most everyone is familiar with the MeToo movement.Do you think you may have been sexually harassed?Here’s the official definition that may help determine the answer:

*Sexual harassment. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and the courts define "sexual harassment" as unwelcome behavior of a sexual nature that:

  • Explicitly or implicitly affects a term or condition of an individual's employment
  • Unreasonably interferes with an employee's work performance
  • Creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work environment
  • Sexual harassment can be:

  • Physical, including unwelcome touching or gesturing
  • Verbal, including unwelcome requests for a date or sexual favors or lewd remarks or sounds
  • Visual, including unwelcome exposure to sexual photos, cartoons, or drawings
  • Just as there are many companies that have and enforce good Sexual Harassment Policies, there are just as many companies who have poor policies or no policies at all, and enforce nothing.

    Regardless of which company you work for, if something happens, you MUST tell someone.But who?Preferably your direct manager and/or Human Resources.But what if your direct manager is the person who harassed you or you don’t have an HR Department?Then go to the next level manager.

    I’ve heard all the reasons why people don’t want to report questionable behavior which focus primarily around fear of losing your job or not wanting to “get someone in trouble”. Do not listen to that little devil on your shoulder.Listen to the other shoulder that is saying you have a right to work in a place that is respectful and where you feel safe and free of any type of harassment.No job is worth being harassed.There are other jobs out there.

    At the very least, tell a co-worker who you know is supportive and ask them to go with you when you tell.

    Why should you tell?Because you don’t want the individual to harass others.Because as I said above, you have a right to work in a place that is free of harassment (it’s the law!). Because it gives you credibility.Credibility is huge.Were there any witnesses to the event?HR will want these names and they will interview these people.If they corroborate your story, there you go, you have instant credibility.Even if there were not any witnesses, but you told someone, and they confirm that you told them – you still gain credibility.That somewhat lessens the problem of “he said, she said”.

    If you wait a year, or longer, HR will ask you why you didn’t tell anyone…. Is there some reason you’re bringing this up now and didn’t then?In other words, are you trying to “get back” at the person for some reason?Or perhaps the relationship was consensual to begin with, but now the person broke up with you or is treating you poorly and you’re out for retaliation.As you can see, things get complicated quickly.But if you’re innocent and are telling the truth, you MUST tell.DO NOT lie, do not make things up – this just ruins it for the true innocent victims in the workplace and you will get caught in your lies.

    Not sure if you’ve been harassed?Don’t have HR to tell?Contact us and we’ll help you walk through the options.

    *Source: BLR

     

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    Do You Lead With A Servant’s Heart?

    Tiffany Boyes - Tuesday, January 29, 2019

    Do You Lead With A Servant’s Heart?

    What does it mean to have a servant’s heart? It means that you not only put other’s needs in front of your own, but that you serve with the right motivation. Looking for rewards or recognition should not be the ultimate goal, nor is it the way to true leadership. The focus, instead, should be on looking out for the good of the whole.

    The best supervisors and managers don’t “boss” their employees around, instead they are an example of what they expect from others. A good example of displaying this is to not be above the menial tasks. The owner of a company I work for has no problem emptying the shredder or picking up a piece of trash. This in turn motivates everyone else to pitch in and do what needs to be done. Even if it’s “not your job”. I’ve always been one to do the little things, but it makes an impact to see the company’s owner and your managers do the same. It shows that effective leadership can motivate employees to perform at their best. In this way, goals are achieved and departments meet or exceed set standards. In a nutshell, developing effective leaders among your managerial staff is essential to the success of your organization.

    So, how does one become a servant leader? It’s simply a matter of following a few easy steps. Instead of spending time defining expectations for your employees, spend it recognizing how you can support them. Stay accountable to your team. Ask for feedback on your actions. Focus on giving power away rather than accumulating it. According to Matt Tenney, author of Serve To Be Great: Leadership Lessons from a Prison, a Monastery, and a Boardroom, “When the focus is on serving team members, leaders can create a team culture that people want to be a part of, that produces superior results, and that has a positive impact on society as a whole. When this happens, leaders win, too, because they get promoted faster and create the conditions for sustainable, long-term success. Perhaps more important, they actually enjoy going to work each day, and the people on their teams do too.”

    Being a servant leader can be immensely rewarding both on a personal as well as professional level. However, it can be challenging to switch the mindset from being a “boss” to being a true servant leader. Following these steps is just the beginning. Communicating with your team and really finding out what works best for your business is key.

    Does this sound like something you would like to take on, then we want to help. We can support you through your goals and help you reach your full potential. Give us a call today for an informal chat about your circumstances. If we are unable to meet all of your HR needs, we will direct you to an HR professional who can.

     

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    Career or Job?

    Tiffany Boyes - Tuesday, January 08, 2019

    Career or Job?   …read more


     

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